HOW WE WORK

Marquis Studios arts‐in­‐education services are an ideal way to bring the arts into classrooms and after school programs while also serving as professional development for staff. Each program is focused on a specific art discipline selected after consultation with client staff. A team of senior management and Teaching Artists design all programs to integrate the arts with instruction in academic subjects by utilizing the NYC Blueprint for Teaching and Learning in the Arts and Common Core Standards. Programs are adapted and customized to the appropriate age level and are available for grades K‐12.

DISTRICT 75

District 75 programming is customized for a variety of ages and developmental levels.

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  • Creative Dramatics

    This residency introduces all levels of District 75 students to fun, theatrical tools of self-expression, group cooperation and dramatic play. Teaching Artists (TAs) adapt creative material according to the physical and cognitive functioning levels of each class. Teachers and para-professionals work together in partnership with TAs, assisting and guiding students when necessary. Classes learn appropriate methods of self-expression and cooperative skills through dramatic play and shared-learning, group experiences. Gross and fine motor skills, range­‐of-motion, response to speech and auditory cues, and other skills drawn from student IEPs are all built as kinesthetic awareness is enhanced through the residency. Students explore healthy boundaries, sensory recognition and acting out of basic emotions as they interact in structured games and exercises. Favorite characters and situations from books or audio/visual material come to life while learning different uses of basic props and costume pieces. Eye‐hand coordination is enhanced through games and activities. This program fosters the student’s self‐esteem and builds the skills of vocal projection, speech articulation, and physical expression. Individual students gain greater self-confidence by “performing” for each other and experience viscerally how dramatic expression can be an effective means of communication. Students also learn to respond appropriately to other classmates’ work, according to individual functioning abilities- whether it is a thumbs up, a picture symbol, an impression of what they’ve seen or giving a helpful suggestion – all vital developmental skills.

    * If administrators, TAs and teachers feel that students would benefit from a presentational experience, some residencies (with higher functioning students) may culminate with an informal, shared performance, or a participatory parent/child workshop. Lower functioning students experience theater arts through a variety of multi-sensory activities solely within the smaller, more familiar classroom setting.
     

    * Students of all levels of physical, emotional, and developmental ability explore healthy boundaries, sensory recognition, response to speech and auditory cues, and acting out of basic emotions as they interact in structured, theatrical games and exercises.

  • Creative Movement

    Creative Movement introduces District 75 students to an exploration of kinesthetic and spatial awareness, creative expression and connection to self and others through movement and music. Teaching Artists adapt creative material according to the physical and cognitive functioning levels of each class. Teachers and para-professionals work together in partnership with TAs, assisting and guiding students when necessary. In this course, students of all functioning levels develop a variety of basic locomotor (traveling through space) and non-locomotor (moving in place) movements. Gross and fine motor skills are increased as the student creatively explores movement as it pertains to their body, those of others, and their surroundings. Through partnering and group/peer interactions, the class develops coordination, body awareness, and new ways to be in positive, appropriate contact with others. Through this residency, each class engages in interactive situations, which demonstrate cause and effect, directionality, and the basic concept of moving through space, while simultaneously encouraging increased balance and agility. Students gain self-confidence and experience the power of movement as an communication tool. Objects such as scarves, ribbon wands, and percussion instruments are often incorporated as multi-sensory, movement-stimulation props. Teaching Artists begin the residency with exercises that build spatial awareness, physical boundaries, safety and group cooperation. Some exercises reinforce color and shape concepts, and teach how to initiate and imitate a variety of simple movements. Other movement-based games teach students to distinguish various auditory cues. Students are challenged to work on mastery of body control, spatial and motor concepts (over, under, around, through, etc.), and movement as a means of self-expression. Music from around the world is incorporated into the residency to reinforce concepts of multi-culturalism and the emotional components of music, as appropriate to the ability of students and the curricula with which the residency aims to integrate.

    * If administrators, TAs and teachers feel that students would benefit from a presentational experience, some residencies (with higher functioning students) may culminate with an informal, shared performance, or a participatory parent/child workshop. Lower functioning students experience movement solely in the safe, familiar space of the classroom, through a variety of multi-sensory activities.

     

    Watch Creative Movement for District 75

  • Drawing

    This course introduces students to a variety of mark-making materials and tools. Students explore a range of surfaces with different textures and absorbencies, and of different sizes and shapes including paper, canvass, charcoal, crayons and markers. Large group projects and smaller, individual projects are presented. Both open-ended free form drawing as well as directed, structured drawing is explored. The teaching artist employs various kinds of stimuli as the impetus for drawing, such as pictures shapes and objects. Projects that involve mirrors and observing other students are provided in classrooms tackling the concept of self-hood, others, and interactions between people.
    * This residency is appropriate for all Special Education populations, allowing for varying degrees of intentionality in mark making, and recognizing that scribble is a recognized stage in human artistic development.
    * Promotes eye-hand coordination, independence, decision-making and social skills.

To view our menu of programs specifically offered for District 75 students, Enter the login code here.

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